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Author Guidelines


Section 1: Introduction comprises introduction of the manuscript. It gives general overview and research problems to solve.
Section 2: Related works contains previous research which relates to the manuscript.
Section 3: Proposed method which explains the method which is proposed in the manuscript.
Section 4: Analysis of the experimental results which describes the results of the experiment along with its analysis.
Section 5: Conclusion of the manuscript.

Authors will be required to submit, MS-Word compatible (.doc, .docx). The manuscript must be at least 9 pages.

A. Abbreviations and Acronyms
• Abbreviations and acronyms should be defined the first time they are used in the text, even after they have already been defined in the abstract.
• Abbreviations such as IEEE, SI, ac, and dc do not have to be defined.
• Abbreviations that incorporate periods should not have spaces: write “C.N.R.S.,” not “C. N. R. S.”
• Please do not use abbreviations in the title unless they are unavoidable (for example, “JUTI” in the title of this article).

B. Other Recommendations
• Please use one space after periods and colons.
• Please use dash for Complex modifiers: “zero-field-cooled magnetization.”
• To avoid dangling participles, such as, “Using (1), the potential was calculated.” [It is not clear who or what used (1).] the authors are strongly advised to write, “The potential was calculated by using (1),” or “Using (1), we calculated the potential.”
• Use a zero before decimal points: “0.25,” not “.25.” Use “cm3,” not “cc.”
• Indicate sample dimensions as “0.1 cm  0.2 cm,” not “0.1  0.2 cm2.”
• The abbreviation for “seconds” is “s,” not “sec.” Use “Wb/m2” or “webers per square meter,” not “webers/m2.”
• When expressing a range of values, write “7 to 9” or “7-9,” not “7~9.”
• A parenthetical statement at the end of a sentence is punctuated outside of the closing parenthesis (like this). (A parenthetical sentence is punctuated within the parentheses.) In American English, periods and commas are within quotation marks, like “this period.” Other punctuation is “outside”!
• Avoid contractions please write “do not” instead of “don’t.”
• The serial comma is preferred: “A, B, and C” instead of “A, B and C.”

If you are using Word, use either the Microsoft Equation Editor or the MathType add-on ( for equations in your paper (Insert | Object | Create New | Microsoft Equation or MathType Equation). “Float over text” should not be selected.


A. Types of Graphics
The following list outlines the different types of graphics published in JUTI. They are categorized based on their construction, and use of color / shades of gray:
1) Color/Grayscale figures
Figures that are meant to appear in color, or shades of black/gray. Such figures may include photographs, illustrations, multicolor graphs, and flowcharts.
2) Lineart figures
Figures that are composed of only black lines and shapes. These figures should have no shades or half-tones of gray. Only black and white.
3) Tables
Data charts which are typically black and white, but sometimes include color.

B. Multipart figures
Figures compiled of more than one sub-figure presented side-by-side, or stacked. If a multipart figure is made up of multiple figure types (one part is lineart, and another is grayscale or color) the figure should meet the stricter guidelines.

C. File Formats for Graphics
Format and save your graphics using a suitable graphics processing program that will allow you to create the images as PostScript (PS), Encapsulated PostScript (.EPS), Tagged Image File Format (.TIFF), Portable Document Format (.PDF), or Portable Network Graphics (.PNG) sizes them, and adjusts the resolution settings. If you created your source files in one of the following programs you will be able to submit the graphics without converting to a PS, EPS, TIFF, PDF, or PNG file: Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint, or Microsoft Excel. Though it is not required, it is recommended that these files be saved in PDF format rather than DOC, XLS, or PPT. Doing so will protect your figures from common font and arrow stroke issues that occur when working on the files across multiple platforms. When submitting your final paper, your graphics should all be submitted individually in one of these formats along with the manuscript.

D. Sizing of Graphics
Most charts, graphs, and tables are one column wide (3.5 inches / 88 millimeters / 21 picas) or page wide (7.16 inches / 181 millimeters / 43 picas). The maximum depth a graphic can be is 8.5 inches (216 millimeters / 54 picas). When choosing the depth of a graphic, please allow space for a caption. Figures can be sized between column and page widths if the author chooses, however it is recommended that figures are not sized less than column width unless when necessary.

E. Resolution
The proper resolution of your figures will depend on the type of figure it is as defined in the “Types of Figures” section. Author photographs, color, and grayscale figures should be at least 300dpi. Lineart, including tables should be a minimum of 600dpi.

F. Vector Art
While JUTI does accept, and even recommends that authors submit artwork in vector format, it is our policy is to rasterize all figures for publication. This is done in order to preserve the figures’ integrity across multiple computer platforms.

G. Color Space
The term color space refers to the entire sum of colors that can be represented within the said medium. For our purposes, the three main color spaces are Grayscale, RGB (red/green/blue) and CMYK (cyan/magenta/yellow/black). RGB is generally used with on-screen graphics, whereas CMYK is used for printing purposes.
All color figures should be generated in RGB or CMYK color space. Grayscale images should be submitted in Grayscale color space. Line art may be provided in grayscale OR bitmap color space. Note that “bitmap colorspace” and “bitmap file format” are not the same thing. When bitmap color space is selected, .TIF/.TIFF is the recommended file format.

H. Accepted Fonts Within Figures
When preparing your graphics JUTI suggests that you use of one of the following Open Type fonts: Times New Roman, Helvetica, Arial, Cambria, and Symbol. If you are supplying EPS, PS, or PDF files all fonts must be embedded. Some fonts may only be native to your operating system; without the fonts embedded, parts of the graphic may be distorted or missing.
A safe option when finalizing your figures is to strip out the fonts before you save the files, creating “outline” type. This converts fonts to artwork what will appear uniformly on any screen.

I. Using Labels Within Figures
1) Figure Axis labels
Figure axis labels are often a source of confusion. Use words rather than symbols. As an example, write the quantity “Magnetization,” or “Magnetization M,” not just “M.” Put units in parentheses. Do not label axes only with units. As in Fig. 1, for example, write “Magnetization (A/m)” or “Magnetization (A m1),” not just “A/m.” Do not label axes with a ratio of quantities and units. For example, write “Temperature (K),” not “Temperature/K.”
Multipliers can be especially confusing. Write “Magnetization (kA/m)” or “Magnetization (103 A/m).” Do not write “Magnetization (A/m)  1000” because the reader would not know whether the top axis label in Fig. 1 meant 16000 A/m or 0.016 A/m. Figure labels should be legible, approximately 8 to 10 point type.
2) Subfigure Labels in Multipart Figures and Tables
Multipart figures should be combined and labeled before final submission. Labels should appear centered below each subfigure in 8 point Times New Roman font in the format of (a) (b) (c).

J. File Naming
Figures (line artwork or photographs) should be named starting with the first 5 letters of the author’s last name. The next characters in the filename should be the number that represents the sequential location of this image in your article. For example, in author “Anderson’s” paper, the first three figures would be named ander1.tif, ander2.tif, and
Tables should contain only the body of the table (not the caption) and should be named similarly to figures, except that ‘.t’ is inserted in-between the author’s name and the table number. For example, author Anderson’s first three tables would be named ander.t1.tif,, ander.t3.eps.
Author photographs should be named using the first five characters of the pictured author’s last name. For example, four author photographs for a paper may be named:, moshc.tif, chen.eps, and duran.pdf.
If two authors or more have the same last name, their first initial(s) can be substituted for the fifth, fourth, third... letters of their surname until the degree where there is differentiation. For example, two authors Michael and Monica Oppenheimer’s photos would be named oppmi.tif, and oppmo.eps.

K. Referencing a Figure or Table Within Your Paper
When referencing your figures and tables within your paper, use the abbreviation “Fig.” even at the beginning of a sentence. Do not abbreviate “Table.” Tables should be numbered with Roman Numerals.

A conclusion section is not required. Although a conclusion may review the main points of the paper, do not replicate the abstract as the conclusion. A conclusion might elaborate on the importance of the work or suggest applications and extensions.

Appendixes, if needed, appear before the acknowledgment.

The preferred spelling of the word “acknowledgment” in American English is without an “e” after the “g.” Use the singular heading even if you have many acknowledgments. Avoid expressions such as “One of us (S.B.A.) would like to thank ... .” Instead, write “F. A. Author thanks ... .” In most cases, sponsor and financial support acknowledgments are placed in the unnumbered footnote on the first page, not here.


A. References
References need not be cited in text. When they are, number citations on the line, in square brackets inside the punctuation. Multiple references are each numbered with separate brackets. When citing a section in a book, please give the relevant page numbers. In text, refer simply to the reference number. Do not use “Ref.” or “reference” except at the beginning of a sentence: “Reference [3] shows ... .” Please do not use automatic endnotes in Word, rather, type the reference list at the end of the paper using the “References” style.
Reference numbers are set flush left and form a column of their own, hanging out beyond the body of the reference. The reference numbers are on the line, enclosed in square brackets. In all references, the given name of the author or editor is abbreviated to the initial only and precedes the last name. Use them all; use et al. only if names are not given. Use commas around Jr., Sr., and III in names. Abbreviate conference titles. When citing journal transactions, provide the issue number, page range, volume number, year, and/or month if available. When referencing a patent, provide the day and the month of issue, or application. References may not include all information; please obtain and include relevant information. Do not combine references. There must be only one reference with each number. If there is a URL included with the print reference, it can be included at the end of the reference.
Other than books, capitalize only the first word in a paper title, except for proper nouns and element symbols. For papers published in translation journals, please give the English citation first, followed by the original foreign-language citation See the end of this document for formats and examples of common references.

B. Footnotes
Number footnotes separately in superscripts (Insert | Footnote). Place the actual footnote at the bottom of the column in which it is cited; do not put footnotes in the reference list (endnotes). Use letters for table footnotes (see Table I).

The word “data” is plural, not singular. The subscript for the permeability of vacuum µ0 is zero, not a lowercase letter “o.” The term for residual magnetization is “remanence”; the adjective is “remanent”; do not write “remnance” or “remnant.” Use the word “micrometer” instead of “micron.” A graph within a graph is an “inset,” not an “insert.” The word “alternatively” is preferred to the word “alternately” (unless you really mean something that alternates). Use the word “whereas” instead of “while” (unless you are referring to simultaneous events). Do not use the word “essentially” to mean “approximately” or “effectively.” Do not use the word “issue” as a euphemism for “problem.” When compositions are not specified, separate chemical symbols by en-dashes; for example, “NiMn” indicates the intermetallic compound Ni0.5Mn0.5 whereas “Ni–Mn” indicates an alloy of some composition NixMn1-x.
Be aware of the different meanings of the homophones “affect” (usually a verb) and “effect” (usually a noun), “complement” and “compliment,” “discreet” and “discrete,” “principal” (e.g., “principal investigator”) and “principle” (e.g., “principle of measurement”). Do not confuse “imply” and “infer.”
Prefixes such as “non,” “sub,” “micro,” “multi,” and “ultra” are not independent words; they should be joined to the words they modify, usually without a hyphen. There is no period after the “et” in the Latin abbreviation “et al.” (it is also italicized). The abbreviation “i.e.,” means “that is,” and the abbreviation “e.g.,” means “for example” (these abbreviations are not italicized).



Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  2. The submission file is in Microsoft Word document file format.
  3. Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  4. You can download the English paper template here and Bahasa Indonesia paper template here.
  5. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines, which is found in About the Journal.
  6. If submitting to a peer-reviewed section of the journal, the instructions in Ensuring a Blind Review have been followed.

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